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MEGAN TRANSPLANTING POTATO PLANTLETS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. First, we gin…


MEGAN TRANSPLANTING POTATO PLANTLETS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. First, we gingerly planted 3000 alfalfa-sprout-like tissue-cultured disease-free Potato Plantlets from their Petri dishes into homemade organic Soil Blocks.
After a couple of weeks the plants – especially the roots – had grown enough for the Soil Blocks to hold it together and survive the rigors of transplanting into these new commercial Mushroom Totes.
Here, Megan is laying out twenty plantlets per tote. Kenyon and Cassidy follow behind her, adding additional organic screened compost to fill up the tote and then water down the works.
We picked a cooler, cloudy day to minimize transplant shock. Behind Megan lays Israeli Netafim irrigation Drippers & Stakes attached to a black supply line.
Next year we’ll find the time to build wood benches so this job will progress to an easier standup effort. With thousands of details to tend to on a family farm, it takes about a generation to get a farm set up really well. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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HERE WE GO AGAIN: JUDGE BUCHWALD DEMONSTRATES ANEW THAT SHE REMAINS DREADFULLY U…


HERE WE GO AGAIN: JUDGE BUCHWALD DEMONSTRATES ANEW THAT SHE REMAINS DREADFULLY UNQUALIFIED TO SERVE AS A JUDGE. The farmers in ‘OSGATA et al v. Monsanto’ – lamentably – came to know well Judge Buchwald and her vile unsuitability to the bench, after she was assigned to our case (https://www.woodprairie.com/articles-related-to-osgata-et-al-vs-monsanto-lawsuit/).
Now, in another new eye-opening case of financial-conflict-of-interest, Judge Buchwald has refused to recuse herself from lawsuits involving Big Pharma (https://www.theepochtimes.com/two-judges-step-down-from-new-york-covid-vaccine-mandates-lawsuit-over-financial-conflicts-of-interest-third-judge-will-stay_4538920.html?utm_source=Health&utm_campaign=health-2022-06-19&utm_medium=email&est=oumCRcAfWUM1o7n9vNJD%2FQRfsIsYwyan2s2sbqCq%2FLZONqi3ngzyA5324w%3D%3D).
Buchwald is infamous for her ill-tempered lack-of-fairness. This misconduct is documented in dour ‘Robing Room’ reviews submitted by attorneys who have practiced before her. (http://www.therobingroom.com/Judge.aspx?ID=1396).
As an judge she is an abject failure. The solution to this recurring judicial injustice is plain: Judge Buchwald MUST resign or be removed from office. Jim

“Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald denied the plaintiffs’ motion to disqualify her from the case. Plaintiffs filed the motion Tuesday after financial disclosures revealed the judge owned $250,000 in Pfizer stock and $100,000 in Johnson & Johnson.”




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PLAYING MUSICAL CHAIRS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. We lost the clutch in one o…


PLAYING MUSICAL CHAIRS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. We lost the clutch in one of our Oliver 1650 Diesel tractors and Caleb won’t have the time to replace it until next month
While we had a welcome rain respite this past week our 8″ of rain over the previous month complicated field work.
Here Caleb has removed a Mid-Mount Toolbar from one tractor and is bolting it onto our Oliver 1850 Diesel. The toolbar is outfitted with Billion Teeth and used for cultivating and hilling potatoes.
The rain prevented field access and now farmers are playing catch-up. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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PLAYING MUSICAL CHAIRS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. We lost the clutch in one o…


PLAYING MUSICAL CHAIRS ON WOOD PRAIRIE FAMILY FARM. We lost the clutch in one of our Oliver 1650 Diesel tractors and Caleb won’t have the time to replace it until next month
While we had a welcome rain respite this past week our 8″ of rain over the previous month complicated field work.
Here Caleb has removed a Mid-Mount Toolbar from one tractor and is bolting it onto our Oliver 1850 Diesel. The toolbar is outfitted with Billion Teeth and used for cultivating and hilling potatoes.
The rain prevented field access and now farmers are playing catch-up. Caleb, Megan & Jim


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BIG POTATO FARMING EQUIPMENT ON FULL DISPLAY. Blackfoot, Idaho based Spudnik Eq…


BIG POTATO FARMING EQUIPMENT ON FULL DISPLAY. Blackfoot, Idaho based Spudnik Equipment – established in 1958 (and the American presence for Grimme Mfg of Germany) and with a branch in nearby Presque Isle, Maine – choreographed this burly display of green and red iron here in Aroostook County back in June, 2020.
Boasting red Spudnik ‘Single Pass Hillers’ on back, thirteen tractors cover 90 rows and 42 acres per pass. Teaming up for this photo op were two of the largest local Central Aroostook farming enterprises: ‘County Super Spuds’ (‘McCrums’ with the green John Deere tractors) and ‘B.D. Grass and Sons’ (‘The Grass Boys’ with red Case/IH tractors and flags).
That’s Mars Hill Mountain in the background. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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BREAKING NEWS! MONSANTO BLISTERED BY 2 MAJOR COURT RULINGS AGAINST DEADLY GLYPH…


BREAKING NEWS! MONSANTO BLISTERED BY 2 MAJOR COURT RULINGS AGAINST DEADLY GLYPHOSATE. Today, the US Supreme Court REJECTED Monsanto/Bayer’s bid to dismiss Multi-Million-Dollar Glyphosate/Roundup Cancer judgements against it (https://www.reuters.com/legal/government/us-supreme-court-rejects-bayer-bid-nix-roundup-weedkiller-suits-2022-06-21/).
Then last Friday, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals STOPPED dead EPA’s corrupt malfeasance and “agreed with several environmental, farm worker and food safety advocacy groups that the EPA did not adequately consider whether glyphosate causes cancer and threatens endangered species.”
With Monsanto’s faulty & deadly Glyphosate herbicide on the ropes, is justice finally beginning to catch up to serial-environmental-crimes-polluter malevolent Monsanto? Jim




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BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF BRIDGEWATER, MAINE. Beautiful Fall shot looking West taken b…


BIRD’S EYE VIEW OF BRIDGEWATER, MAINE. Beautiful Fall shot looking West taken by talented Aroostook photographer Paul Cyr from his death-defying powered-parachute.
Metropolitan Bridgewater (Pop. 532) is at bottom and that’s ‘Main Street’ (US Route 1) going from left to right. Virtually all big fields are potato fields either just harvested or in sod rotation waiting their turn.
Taking off from Main Street is arrow-straight three-mile long ‘Bootfoot Road’ (aka ‘Beauford’ and ‘West’ Road).
In 1803, while the District of Maine was still a part of Massachusetts. the 3-mile x 6-mile section of wilderness south of Bootfoot was named ‘Portland Academy Grant,’ and another 3-mile x 6-mile plot north of Bootfoot was named ‘Bridgewater Academy Grant.’ The two half-Townships were administratively combined into a single 6 x 6 mile Township. Since Maine already had one Portland, the Township in time became named ‘Bridgewater’ after the Massachusetts Town of the same name.
Like every other Aroostook Town, Bridgewater had been all woods and every field has been cleared from the woods.
Wood Prairie Family Farm is the last farm at the very ‘end of Bootfoot,’ abutting the resplendent North Maine Woods. The neighboring old Doss Morse farm is now the open green hay farm on the north side of Bootfoot. Our fields and buildings are mostly hidden by surround trees but if you look closely you can see a thin left-to-right tannish gap to the left of Doss’ and those are thirty acres of fields we’ve cleared. The hardwood-covered rise this side of them is ‘Estabrook Hill.’
In the distance, the Bootfoot arrow points to Saddleback Mtn, Number Nine Mtn and Spruce Top Mountain. Number Nine Lake is nettled in the bowl between them. ‘Number Nine Lake Road’ takes off perpendicular to the right at the end of Bootfoot and meanders for nine miles up to Nine Lake. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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APPLYING NETTING TO THE WOOD PRAIRIE MINITUBER LONG TUNNEL. It’s been nine year…


APPLYING NETTING TO THE WOOD PRAIRIE MINITUBER LONG TUNNEL. It’s been nine years since we’ve had a wet Spring like this one in which in order to get planting work done we must re-order our lives and dodge the rain. We’ve now had virtually 8″ of rain in the past month with more on the way.
Last Sunday we began our 2-day process and laid out the 600-foot of ground fabric and then intensive-planted tissue-cultured Potato Minitubers.
Come rainy days Monday and Tuesday we caught up shipping seed orders.
Then, here last Wednesday we placed into position and anchored the thirty 20-foot metal hoop-sections. We then laid out and secured the heavy-duty aphid-proof netting we brought in from France.
In this shot, we’re using a pair of tractor-drawn carts to reel-out the netting. Caleb’s brother-in-law Rob is up high on the right unit. Megan is out of view driving the tractor on the left. Caleb’s nephew-in-law Miguel and sister Amy work as a team keeping the netting taught and securing it with vinyl-covered ‘Wiggle Wire’ in bottom-edge wire channels. Out of view Kenyon is laying paving bricks.
Also, out of view working opposite on the right side, Caleb, Cassidy and Jim systematically secure the netting and laying brick
The paving bricks – placed nose to tail – serve to further anchor the tunnel and prevent critters from gaining entry.
By mid-afternoon we’d finished this job and went back to shipping orders.
Rain returned Thursday night around 9pm, right when Jim was finishing up his first cultivation pass through the field potatoes with the finger-weeder.
During a wet Spring the driest ground is found right before the next rain. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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EMPTY PALLET BOXES AWAITING CLEANING. Once planting is complete we shift over t…


EMPTY PALLET BOXES AWAITING CLEANING. Once planting is complete we shift over to Summer tasks which include cleaning and disinfecting with bleach hundreds of hardwood pallet boxes. The disinfection is a Best Management Practice (BMP) aimed primarily at stopping the spread of the dreaded Bacterial Ring Rot (BRR).
Today was yet another wet, gray day in Aroostook County. With that rain that fell since last night, we now have had over 7″ of rain in the past four weeks.
There are still some local farmers who have not yet planted all their potatoes – despite planting all day and up until 10-11pm at night during dry weather – because of wet ground problems.
In wet Maine Springs it can go like this: You plant potatoes on a Monday. Then it rains Tuesday. It drys out some on Wednesday. On Thursday you get another day of planting in. Then it rains again Friday into Saturday. Now with the accumulating moisture and with little to no evapo-transpiration to help out, you need the rest of Saturday and all of Sunday for the ground to dry out again. With each rain it takes longer to dry back out. This is how one week can qucikly degenerate into just two good days of planting.
If you’re tempted to be impatient and work the soil too wet in the Spring, you run the risk of compacting and crusting over the soil. Then you’ll be plagued for the rest of Summer and into Harvest when you dig up big clods that accompany the potatoes coming out of the ground.
Wiser to sit and wait. Caleb, Megan & Jim




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