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Pre-sprouting and Cutting Seed Potatoes | MOTHER EARTH NEWS

A GOOD & TIMELY EXPLANATION OF HOW TO HANDLE AND CUT SEED POTATOES. Pam Dawling is an experienced farmer at Twin Oaks Community in Virginia. Fortunately for all of us, she is also a prolific and masterful writer of gardening how-to.
Once you buy organic Certified Seed Potatoes from a mail order company like ours (www.woodprairie.organic) there will some rules to follow for success.
Our 'Organic Potato Growing Guide' (https://woodprairie.com/downloads/Growing_Guide_2020.pdf) outlines all the basic steps. Pam's new article in 'The Mother Earth News' dives deep into how and when to plant. Don't miss it! Caleb, Megan & Jim

"Potatoes are a rewarding crop to grow, with a lot more flexibility about planting dates than the traditional instruction to plant on St Patrick’s Day might have you believe. If you have suddenly decided to grow potatoes this year, buy your seed potatoes asap and set them to pre-sprout (chit), while figuring out where they’re going to grow and preparing the soil. Then plant and, before they emerge, figure out what to do next…

"In the fall, frosts will kill the tops and growth will stop, so late plantings should be timed to get the tubers to maturity before the expected frost date. In central Virginia, we plant our first crop in mid-March, about four weeks before our last spring frost, and plant a second crop in mid-late June, which allows three and a half to four months before our average first frost date. We could plant any time mid-March to mid-June and harvest mature potatoes. Some late varieties do not bulk up until the last moment, so if you are pushing the late end of your planting season, plant early varieties or fingerlings. (“Early” = fast-maturing)."

Pre-sprouting and Cutting Seed Potatoes | MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Learn how pre-sprouting (chitting) seed potatoes for 2-4 weeks before planting can help you make progress while the weather is too cold to plant outdoors


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