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TIME FOR JUSTICE: MAJOR 'DICAMBA' HERBICIDE DRIFT LAWSUIT REACHES COUR…

TIME FOR JUSTICE: MAJOR 'DICAMBA' HERBICIDE DRIFT LAWSUIT REACHES COURT THIS WEEK. Farmer Bill Bader has the largest Peach Orchard in Missouri. Mr. Bader alleges his Peach trees have suffered recurring extensive damage EVERY YEAR since 2015 by Bayer/Monsanto and BASF's volatile-prone 'Dicamba' herbicide.
It comes as no surprise that Monsanto lawyers are deploying their infamous 'Monsanto Doctrine': "All we know for sure is it's not our fault."
In recent years, Dicamba has been used by farmers growing genetically-engineered (GE) herbicide-tolerant (HT) cotton and soybeans as an alternative to Monsanto's failing 'Roundup Ready' GE varieties in which deadly Glyposate-based herbicides have developed huge problems with significant weed resistance. Caleb, Megan & Jim

"After five years of reported crop damage by the weed killer dicamba, German agribusiness companies Bayer and BASF will head to trial next week to defend themselves against charges that they intentionally caused the problem in order to increase their profits.

"The lawsuit, originally filed in November 2016 by a southeastern Missouri peach farmer, alleges that Monsanto, which was acquired by Bayer in 2018, and BASF created the circumstances that have damaged millions of acres of crops…

"'Through their partnership, joint ventures, shared technologies, and mutual greed, Defendants have conspired to create and encourage an ecological disaster in Missouri and other states to increase the profits and demand for their dicamba products,' the lawsuit states…

"The allegations revolve around dicamba, a volatile weed killer originally developed in the 1960s that gained more popularity in recent years after Monsanto developed genetically engineered soybean and cotton seeds that could withstand being sprayed by the herbicide…

"Prior to the resistant seeds, dicamba had not been widely sprayed during growing season because of its propensity to drift. Instead, it was largely used as a 'burndown' weed killer to control weeds before planting and after harvest'…

"Even after their new versions of dicamba were approved, the damage continued. In 2017, an estimated 3.1 million acres of soybeans were damaged by dicamba, according to an analysis by University of Missouri crop science professor Kevin Bradley."




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